Sherrie Mathieson, style consultant

Sherrie's Blog

“Six ways to avoid shopping mistakes..”

Thursday, November 6, 2014

..are discussed in the WSJ article "Oops I Did it Again" by Meenal Mistry.She begins.."HELL HATH NO FURY like a woman with ill-fitting designer pants and a receipt bearing the hateful red block letters: "FINAL SALE."Sooo true!..she continues"That woman, dear reader, was me—standing before a full-length mirror in my bedroom, puzzling over the inexplicable combination of a gaping waist and narrower-than-comfortable legs on a pair of Céline tuxedo trousers, and, of course, getting madder by the minute.My impotent anger was directed as much toward the bubbly and seemingly well-intentioned blonde salesgirl who talked me into buying them ("You'll have them forever!" she retail-cheerleaded) as it was toward myself. After all, as a fashion professional in her late 30s, I had over time crafted a precise set of rules to avoid just such mishaps. But I had neglected to follow them. The punishment—mental anguish over the loss of a few hundred dollars—felt cruel and unusual...." In summary: #1 Walk away if the iem you're considering doesn't immediately make you feel fantastic.#2 Sales are suspect-Well made wardrobe builders rarely languish on racks (yes even at high prices!). #3 Tailors are not fashion wizards..they can only do so much.#4 Hold grudges--keep a list of blunders, so you're not doomed to repeat them.#5 The Internet is key to shopping well...especially "What's New" and Amazon's Universal Wish List". #6 You will lose on shoes?...well they're the biggest gamble, because you don't know if they fit till you've worn them. So make an educated guess, and walk on a rug awhile before you hit the sidewalks:)...

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The style “Elephant in the Room” for women in power..

Saturday, November 1, 2014

The exhibit and this humorous article review is well worth your time, if the seemingly forever "head scratching" issue of "women in power's" style is of interest to you. It is to me as a stylist, certainly--but it is also part of the larger discussion of the subliminal language of style.I  hold that most women political candidates, and newscasters, political wives  (also under public scrutiny) are rarely "into" clothes. They are thrown into this position as women in the public's eye. The proof of the pudding, is that very few do it well. Again, I hold that "interest" makes you better at anything in life. The lack of real interest coupled by current ideas on what's appropriate and the constraints of their personal physiques--present less than wonderful results. Since being more attractive not only makes a huge difference in female self-confidence--and also the subliminal public view of the individual (having nothing to do with your true worth but all about contributing to "likability"). I wonder why more (men too!) don't invest in a really good stylist as they would seek the council of a good doctor for health issues?

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Boomers imagined they’d never age….

Thursday, September 25, 2014

"Now we have to deal with it.." writes Michele Willens in The NYTimes, "When Did We Get So Old?". This "must-read" article hits so many truths, I had to smile (or grimace?) in recognition..."Why some of us cope better with the troubling transition may be based on how we measure our self-esteem. “If a person bases his or her pride of self on having won a tournament at 18, they are very vulnerable later on,” says Dr. Gould. “There’s money, there are houses, there are face-lifts. They all help a little, but none matters enough unless your sense of self is not directly related to age.”

Even deciding whether or not to color our hair, not to mention take advantage of cosmetic procedures, presents a boomer dilemma: Can we stay true to our feminism while ceding to our narcissism? In her memoir, Hillary Rodham Clinton writes about being the toughest in the rooms where war and peace were discussed. Still, she is already seeing that her health, fatigue-factor, and even becoming a grandmother may yet speak unspoken volumes. It won’t be much fun being the oldest in the race.

The uh-oh moments, of course, do not come only when we look around that proverbial room and find that everyone else looks like they just attended their bar or bat mitzvah. But the ones that tend to gnaw are when someone gets up to offer you a seat, calls you ma’am, asks if you have grandchildren. Desperately seeking compliments can become a full-time job."....

I contemplate these issues and navigate through the same  emotions daily. My experience in the world of style has empowered me to think up my new philosophy for boomers like myself. There is no doubt (Gwen Stefani agrees:))If you look more youthful and your best--it helps your self confidence in a youth centered world. It does not include the obvious shops, nor what the media often touts. I take it as a challenge.

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Personal Shopper Betty Halbreich is still going strong!

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Sept 7th NYT's "Night Out With" featured Betty Halbreich's newest book party for "I'll Drink To That". Joan Rivers and Michael Kors, were supposed to host. It's hard to believe that Betty is now 86 years old, and still at it as BG's top personal shopper.I used Betty's services for many years, as I styled all sorts of projects.She was tough-- my business sometimes tested her patience--but we respected one another. Her honesty was a good trait--and when she complimented me --it meant something.I look forward to reading her book, and wish her "all the best!".

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How to wear red/white and blue…stylishly?

Thursday, July 3, 2014

Here it is --The Fourth Of July! Let's take a break from the world's (and our personal) problems to relax and celebrate. Generally, most of you may want to dress casually (but not "corny") for whatever you're doing..barbecues, road trips etc.I'll begin with our feet because style and comfort is essential. Did you know there's a rubber-soled revolution going on? So depending on your age and body type, you can make a great choice of sneakers in many colors --but of course red, white and blue are everywhere. J Crew has worked with Nike and New Balance on some fabulous sneakers in red and in navy. They also have navy striped espadrilles. Prada came out with their leather version (soooo chic) of Converse sneakers in white or red, and suede moccassins.. This color scheme can carry you well through this summer.

Tods has gorgeous red and navy driving moccassins. Some are in patent--which are better for rainy days.

I believe in keeping things simple with updated classics and some layering if you wish. This morning Martha Stewart (now in her 70s!) wore an age and figure appropriate outfit on the Today Show. Her base outfit was white (invest in white cotton pants,--especially white jeans!) --then she layered it with a blue sweater that was short sleeved and shorter than the underlayer (Martha's challennge--to detract from a heavy middle area, otherwise known as an "apple" figure). She wore navy wedge-espadrilles to lengthen her already long legs (for a thinner overall look). It was stylish with clean lines.

I'll offer some samples of personal favorites!

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A discussion on ageless style

Sunday, May 25, 2014

This interview covers some of my thoughts, that would help your quest for a timeless, youthful age appropriate style.We explore inspiration and how to aquire the skills and the "eye". What is beauty as we age? What works, and what are the pitfalls?...t's a long talk but covers some interesting ground. Curious? I hope so!

http://webtalkradio.net/Shows/LivingWithMoreStyleThanCash/lwm051214.mp3

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Mom Genes as opposed to Mom’s Jeans

Friday, May 16, 2014

Cute OP-ART article on Mother's day about borrowing from mom.http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/05/11/opinion/sunday/opart-shapton-mom-genes.html?_r=0

But it's important for Boomer ladies to note that most of the items photographed including this coat is best when worn in your 20s or 30s --even though the sentiment is lovely. As one ages fabric quality is extremely important. Fabrics that have been "worn" by time will age you. Certain styles will age you as well. Only the best of the best of yesteryear can compare to a new purchase of good quality today. The best items to "steal" are accessories...particularly high-end ones.I was never fortunate to inherit any accessories from my still (touch wood!) active mom --although her knitting talent was inspirational throughout my life. But I inherited a gorgeous Mexican silver necklace passed on to my mom from my Aunt Ruth, and recently given to me. I love this necklace and feel close to both women when I wear it.

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A MOM’S and DAUGHTER’S UNDENIABLE STYLE INFLUENCE

Sunday, May 11, 2014

Some words from "Steal This Style"...in honor of Mom's Day...

My most vivid clothing memories, are the ones I created myself. I suspect many of you also took long but memorable detours off the fashion freeway before settling on wherever it is you’ve arrived now. It took me a while to understand the beautiful elements of the classic style my mother favored as a young woman. Let’s face it: the 60’s happened, and, well, wow! All bets were off. My picture album lays witness to my experimentation. It was a challenge for my girlfriends and me to keep up with new styles – so much so it kept us up at night!

The pieces that were coming from designers filled me with aesthetic adrenalin. I had my grandmother, a seamstress, recreate suits I imagined Audrey H. and Jackie O. would have worn. In the 70’s I embraced hot pants as some do religion. They were often extremely abbreviated and made from suede or even fully sequined – the less the merrier (oh, no…oh yes). Those were the days of fakery deluxe. False eyelashes, and artificial “falls” (hairpieces), scarves on the head with large gold earrings were all part of the look.

Clothes were my way of showing my creativity and high-fashion bent. I, like many of you, was just doing “my thing” – experimenting and having fun, using myself as a test tube and model. Our age and the era gave us a pass on appropriate – even the most “out there” fads looked completely suitable. My mother, tried to block the doorway , ( fearing for my safety in these outlandish ensembles) and asked: “You’re not really going out that way…are you?” Yes, I always did! Funny thing, you could still be hearing that same fateful question, but it probably is no longer coming from your mother. It may well be your daughter who is now concerned about your current look.

The Stylish Art of Translation

This role reversal isn’t terribly surprising. A lot of us are confused, and as a result are either stuck in the past or have simply given up and wear what’s easy, which is not necessarily the most flattering. Women clients always ask me, “What is appropriate?” They come from a variety of backgrounds, are of different ages, and work in all sorts of occupations and fields. They want clothing solutions that are tailored to their lifestyle, personality, and changing physiques.

To guide them correctly, I formed a truly workable wardrobe theory, grounded in classics, but which also included the habit of constantly reassessing clients’ and my own attire in order for all of us to remain totally modern. I abandoned my taste for extreme styles long ago, and, after donating a baleful of trendy clothes to charity; I made a mental note of what never to re-visit (i.e., extremely wide shoulder pads and excessive bling to name just two). Updated classicism handily provides an ageless look, while forming a solid foundation for what I call the art of the mix, or the ability to add in trendier pieces, combine designers and mingle styles. With this groundwork, any woman can individualize with accessories and separates that express her unique personality and interests.

The art of the mix…sounds good, doesn’t it? You’re no doubt wondering how you make such a wardrobe shift – and where your daughter (or the younger generation) fits in? Well, it starts with observation. Generational interplay keeps us from stagnation. Curiosity keeps our minds fresh and encourages a natural eagerness to grow. Great news in my estimation.To that end why shouldn’t you take the time to observe women ten, even twenty years your junior, and “borrow” judiciously from their choices, always translating to suit your body, your age and lifestyle? This process organically leads to reassessment, creativity and renewal. Consider your personal style afresh every five years… at least…and a youthful flair may more easily enter the bargain.

 

 

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A MOM’S and DAUGHTER’S UNDENIABLE STYLE INFLUENCE

Sunday, May 11, 2014

Some words from "Steal This Style"...in honor of Mom's Day...

My most vivid clothing memories, are the ones I created myself. I suspect many of you also took long but memorable detours off the fashion freeway before settling on wherever it is you’ve arrived now. It took me a while to understand the beautiful elements of the classic style my mother favored as a young woman. Let’s face it: the 60’s happened, and, well, wow! All bets were off. My picture album lays witness to my experimentation. It was a challenge for my girlfriends and me to keep up with new styles – so much so it kept us up at night!

The pieces that were coming from designers filled me with aesthetic adrenalin. I had my grandmother, a seamstress, recreate suits I imagined Audrey H. and Jackie O. would have worn. In the 70’s I embraced hot pants as some do religion. They were often extremely abbreviated and made from suede or even fully sequined – the less the merrier (oh, no…oh yes). Those were the days of fakery deluxe. False eyelashes, and artificial “falls” (hairpieces), scarves on the head with large gold earrings were all part of the look.

Clothes were my way of showing my creativity and high-fashion bent. I, like many of you, was just doing “my thing” – experimenting and having fun, using myself as a test tube and model. Our age and the era gave us a pass on appropriate – even the most “out there” fads looked completely suitable. My mother, tried to block the doorway , ( fearing for my safety in these outlandish ensembles) and asked: “You’re not really going out that way…are you?” Yes, I always did! Funny thing, you could still be hearing that same fateful question, but it probably is no longer coming from your mother. It may well be your daughter who is now concerned about your current look.

The Stylish Art of Translation

This role reversal isn’t terribly surprising. A lot of us are confused, and as a result are either stuck in the past or have simply given up and wear what’s easy, which is not necessarily the most flattering. Women clients always ask me, “What is appropriate?” They come from a variety of backgrounds, are of different ages, and work in all sorts of occupations and fields. They want clothing solutions that are tailored to their lifestyle, personality, and changing physiques.

To guide them correctly, I formed a truly workable wardrobe theory, grounded in classics, but which also included the habit of constantly reassessing clients’ and my own attire in order for all of us to remain totally modern. I abandoned my taste for extreme styles long ago, and, after donating a baleful of trendy clothes to charity; I made a mental note of what never to re-visit (i.e., extremely wide shoulder pads and excessive bling to name just two). Updated classicism handily provides an ageless look, while forming a solid foundation for what I call the art of the mix, or the ability to add in trendier pieces, combine designers and mingle styles. With this groundwork, any woman can individualize with accessories and separates that express her unique personality and interests.

The art of the mix…sounds good, doesn’t it? You’re no doubt wondering how you make such a wardrobe shift – and where your daughter (or the younger generation) fits in? Well, it starts with observation. Generational interplay keeps us from stagnation. Curiosity keeps our minds fresh and encourages a natural eagerness to grow. Great news in my estimation.To that end why shouldn’t you take the time to observe women ten, even twenty years your junior, and “borrow” judiciously from their choices, always translating to suit your body, your age and lifestyle? This process organically leads to reassessment, creativity and renewal. Consider your personal style afresh every five years… at least…and a youthful flair may more easily enter the bargain.

 

 

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Hollywood Costume exhibit thats a “Must See!”

Saturday, May 10, 2014

I feel more than ever that the Pheonix Museum, is "world class".

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F Murray Abraham richly deserves kudos as an excellent actor..but..!

Thursday, March 27, 2014

F Murray Abraham was the first actor I ever costumed. It was my first "costuming" job--and it was for a Salada Tea commercial for one of the A-list commercial companies at the time. I swathed him in Indian silk as I imagined would befit a traditional east Indian. Thankfully this led to 550 (at least) other commissions in the field. F Murray went soon after to win an Oscar for his amazing portrayal of Salieri in Amadeus. Recently he has enjoyed a resurgence of great acting parts.So I was not surprised to see him recently on the Today Show talking about Wes Anderson (who has terrific personal style) and his role in The Grand Budapest Hotel. However (with a capital H) I was really put aback by his attire. For this interview Murray (his real name) decided on a yellow/blue stripe rugby shirt with a black sport coat. He paired this with baggy chinos and Rockport type black oxfords. Jeez, he's still young in his early 70s. Does man live by talent alone? Perhaps...perhaps many men do.

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Joined Thumbtack.com for easy quotes on my style consulting

Monday, March 10, 2014

Thumbtack is another way to hire me. Give it a go!

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